Civic Engagement

If you had asked me what was possible in this world a year ago, I probably would have been like, “Well, nothing’s possible because this world is in shambles.” Since I’ve been introduced to Narrative 4, there’s literally nothing I can think of right now that I think is impossible. Lauren, high school student

Right now not only as a nation, but as humans, we are divided. Whether it be the color of our skin or the things we believe in, it seems that everyone has a problem with something. But I believe, as people, we’re so much more than that. If we would just sit down with someone we have differences with and learn more about each other through the process of storytelling, the world would be a better place, one story at a time. Ethan, high school student

How can students’ stories lead them to an expanded sense of self? 

Students’ stories are a doorway into their engagement with the world: they teach us what they know and want to know. N4 honors student voices by creating space for their stories and by giving them opportunities for action. In Storytelling for Positive Change, students decide: 

  • how they want to investigate the larger issues that impact their lives 
  • how they can be of use to others

N4's framework for civic engagement follows a process of moving from "me" to "we." Students see that what they already understand, feel, and have experienced is a powerful resource. As students investigate curriculum content, they explore the question, "Why do these ideas matter to me and my community/ies?” Engaged learning means that students choose how to answer that question in forms of civic engagement that can be internal -- reflection -- and/or public -- identifying issues and creating community for positive change. We provide models of what that might look like.

If you had asked me what was possible in this world a year ago, I probably would have been like, “Well, nothing’s possible because this world is in shambles.” Since I’ve been introduced to Narrative 4, there’s literally nothing I can think of right now that I think is impossible. Lauren, high school student
Right now not only as a nation, but as humans, we are divided. Whether it be the color of our skin or the things we believe in, it seems that everyone has a problem with something. But I believe, as people, we’re so much more than that. If we would just sit down with someone we have differences with and learn more about each other through the process of storytelling, the world would be a better place, one story at a time. Ethan, high school student
How can students’ stories lead them to an expanded sense of self? 
Students’ stories are a doorway into their engagement with the world: they teach us what they know and want to know. N4 honors student voices by creating space for their stories and by giving them opportunities for action. In Storytelling for Positive Change, students decide: 
how they want to investigate the larger issues that impact their lives 
how they can be of use to others
N4's framework for civic engagement follows a process of moving from "me" to "we." Students see that what they already understand, feel, and have experienced is a powerful resource. As students investigate curriculum content, they explore the question, "Why do these ideas matter to me and my community/ies?” Engaged learning means that students choose how to answer that question in forms of civic engagement that can be internal -- reflection -- and/or public -- identifying issues and creating community for positive change. We provide models of what that might look like.